Hints & Tips

 

Here’s another simple way to attach edging to fabric without working dirctly onto the fabric, this time for more delicate fabrics like those used for garments and handkerchiefs.

 

What happens when you get a bit obsessed with your filet crochet project and work on it as much as possible? Your hands cramp up and you get a deep groove in your thread-carrying finger!

 

I first got addicted to making doilies because I could pick a pattern and just get started with any thread I had on hand. I never had to worry about gauge again or whether the item was the right size. Cool! (Insert wrong buzzer sound here…)

 

Have you ever come across a pattern with several sizes of doilies in the same design, and wondered which size you should make? Actually, the designer intended for you to make all of them, and at least six of each!

 

“The pretty custom of offering an especially attractive towel to a guest comes to us from Japan—where politeness is said to be a national virtue.” (1918)

 

Many vintage tablecloths or pillowcases aren’t usable because the fabric has holes and stains. In most cases the lace edging that was crocheted directly into the hem will be in perfect condition.

 

If you have a length of crocheted lace edging or insertion that’s too long for your project, you can cut it safely using the following method to prevent raveling at the cut edge.

 

Any attractive wide insertion in filet crochet may be combined with ribbon of the same width to make a very pretty door panel or curtain. Make the outside strips the longest, and the center strip the shortest, with the length of the strips gradually decreasing.

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